The Five R’s of Education

Let’s take a little trip back in time, about 10 years, to 2005.  At that time, I attended a conference of the International Center for Leadership in Education (http://www.leadered.com) held in Nashville, TN.  Willard R. Daggett, Ed.D., is Founder and Chairman of the organization, which advocates for a framework of Rigor and Relevance in the classroom.  It was a time before Common Core curriculum was one of the hot topics of the day, and state educational testing had just emerged as a result of the “No Child Left Behind” initiatives of the Bush administration which were signed into law in January of 2002.  Last year, ICLE published a white paper on Achieving Academic Excellence (http://www.leadered.com/pdf/Achieving_Academic_Excellence_2014.pdf ) which speaks to the continued importance of Rigor and Relevance in today’s curriculum design.

Several years later, in 2008, Bob Lenz, Co-Founder of Envision Education, and Executive Director of the Buck Institute for Education in Novato, CA, published an article in Edutopia which added two more R’s, namely “Relationships” and “Results” (http://www.edutopia.org/envision-schools-rigor).

In a systems thinking framework, since “Results” are, well, results, they’re not an element of the system, but rather the “result” or “overarching principle” of the system of three elements created by Rigor, Relevance and Relationships.

That’s a good start.

But in systems thinking there are at least five elements that create a complete system.  The fourth is somehow part of the other three, while the fifth is the “glue” that holds the system together, and is an element that is usually so obvious that we miss it.  With that in mind, here are the Five R’s of Education:

  • Rigor
  • Relevance
  • Relationships
  • Responsibility
  • Respect

Note that the last two elements address issues regarding bullying, discipline and a host of other items that teachers and administrators deal with on a daily basis.

Further, today’s children may not be learning these traits from their parents.  Someone’s got to teach them.

 

Posted in edu-cat-ion.